The Boys in the Band is a flashy relic

When Mart Crowley’s The Boys in the Band made its Broadway debut 52 years ago, the world was a very different place, especially for the LGBTQI community … which wasn’t even referred to as the LGBTQI community at the time because in many places being homosexual was still illegal in 1968. When The Boys in the Band opened on Broadway, the Stonewall was just a bar, not an iconic location where the gay rights movement began. So it’s risky mounting this relic of the past again today, on stage (as it was for the 50th anniversary) or on film (with […]

Fall 2020 reading list

Fiction shelf Not meant to be read on an empty stomach, or even if you’re the slightest bit hungry (there’s a lot of cooking and eating!), Memorial (Riverhead, 2020) the debut novel by Bryan Washington (author of the acclaimed 2019 short story collection Lot) introduces us to Benson and Mike, a mixed race (one Black and one Japanese) gay couple negotiating their fragile and strained romantic connection while also trying to maintain relationships with their complicated families. The must-read book of the season. Finding Tulsa (Palm Drive Publishing, 2020), the new novel by Lammy Award-winning novelist and longtime journalist Jim […]

Haute House

It could be said that “Unzipped,” Douglas Keeves’ popular documentary about fashion designer Isaac Mizrahi, started a trend. Since that time, docs detailing the rise of influential couturiers, including Alexander McQueen (2018’s “McQueen”), Halston (2010’s “Ultrasuede” and 2019’s “Halston”), Valentino (2008’s “Valentino: The Last Emperor”), Yves Saint Lauren (2010’s “L’amour fou”) and Vivienne Westwood (“Westwood: Punk, Icon, Activist”), have been the rage. David Ebersole and Todd Hughes’ “House of Cardin” (Altered Innocence/Utopia), now available on DVD, about fashion legend Pierre Cardin, ranks among the best on (or off) the rack. What makes this indisputable is that Cardin, who turned 98 […]

2020 LGBTQ History Month playlist

Andy Bell, of Erasure, is the grand dame of this playlist. The vocal half of the electronic dance-pop duo (alongside the quieter multi-instrumentalist Vince Clarke) now in its 35th year, the unabashedly gay Bell can still stir up all the feels with his powerful and emotive voice. The Neon (Mute), the twosome’s 18th album, arrives a few years after the politically-influenced World Be Gone (and its orchestrally reimagined follow-up World Beyond), feels more personal, especially on songs such as “Nerves of Steel,” “Tower of Love,” “No Point in Tripping,” “Careful What I Try to Do” and the ballad “New Horizons.” […]

Playing it straight

James Sweeney’s queer rom-com Straight Up (Strand), now available on DVD, has more in common with Woody Allen’s Annie Hall than you might expect. Like Allen did for Annie Hall, Sweeney wrote, directed and stars in Straight Up. Like Allen’s Annie Hall character Alvy, Sweeney’s Todd is a nerdy, obsessive compulsive, in therapy, who is in search of companionship. Similarities between the two probably end there. In Straight Up, gay millennial Todd is undergoing a severe sexual identity crisis, or so he tells friends Ryder (James Scully) and Meg (Dana Drori) in an L.A. diner. He believes he could statistically […]

The Aggie and the ecstasy: an interview with filmmaker Catherine Gund

Lesbian documentary filmmaker Catherine Gund has an exceptional eye for subject matter when it comes to her movie projects. Of course, it helps that she was already familiar with the people, including gay performance artist Ron Athey, the late lesbian Mexican singer Chavela Vargas, and choreographer Elizabeth Streb, who is also a lesbian. However, she probably wasn’t as well acquainted with them as she is with the subject of her new doc Aggie (Strand Releasing/Aubin Pictures), which is about her mother; art collector and philanthropist Agnes Gund. Agnes’ name may be familiar to some readers from her tenure as president […]

She May Be Southern, But Don’t Ring Her Bell: Getting Real with Sutton Stracke

Southern Debutante-turned Beverly Hills socialite, Sutton Stracke is one of the newest cast members of this current season of The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills.  Sparkling with charm, style and utter sophistication, Stracke has garnered much popularity with viewers for her candid wit and social grace.  Baltimore OUTloud was thrilled to chat with Stracke regarding her commitment as an LGBTQ ally, her background in the arts, and the importance on giving back through philanthropic endeavors.                “Well, hi Frankie! How are you in Baltimore? Did y’all miss the hurricane?” inquired the delightful Stracke.  Chatting with Baltimore OUTloud a few days […]

Filmmaker Doug Spearman’s New Film Takes Audiences ‘From Zero to I Love You’

In the movie From Zero to I Love You, writer and director Doug Spearman takes audiences on a rollercoaster ride as the lives of characters Jack Dickinson and Pete Logsdon intertwine.  The LGBTQ film allows audiences to explore what happens when a one-night stand turns into a once-in-a-lifetime love for both characters.  Spearman recently chatted with Baltimore OUTloud regarding his inspiration for the film, what he’s most proud from the work, and his Maryland connection. “I have a very emotional, personal attachment to this film,” began Spearman, who grew up in Hyattsville, Maryland. “This is because [the film is] based […]

Actor Scott Bailey Charms Audiences in New LGBTQ Film

In the movie From Zero to I Love You, audiences find themselves on a passionate rollercoaster ride as the lives of Jack Dickinson (Scott Bailey, Guiding Light, Prayers for Bobby) and Pete Logsdon (Darryl Stephens, Noah’s Arc, Boy Culture) intertwine. The captivating LGBTQ film from writer and director Doug Spearman showcases an exceptionally talented cast. Devastatingly handsome actor and LGBTQ ally, Scott Bailey, recently discussed how he prepared for this role, what drew him to this film, and what he is most proud of with his performance.                Bailey first learned about this film when he was contacted for the […]

The end of innocence

The late gay filmmaker Luchino Visconti (Death in Venice, The Damned) went out with a bang, so to speak, with his over-the-top final feature, 1976’s L’Innocente (Film Movement), now available on Blu-ray. Based on the 1892 novel by Gabriele D’Annunzio, L’Innocente gave Visconti plenty of opportunity to exercise his operatic excesses. Tullio (Giancarlo Giannini), a despicable chauvinist and charmer, is the kind of unfaithful husband who shows up at a piano recital with his devoted wife Giuliana (Laura Antonelli) and is openly flirtatious with his mistress, the widowed Teresa (Jennifer O’Neil). If that’s not bad enough, Tullia basically insults Giuliana […]