Some of the best fun you’ll have in planning your wedding is visiting venues! You get to see interesting and unique spaces, some of which you’d never see otherwise.

Choosing a venue takes time. There is information to gather, places to visit, and time to spend talking and reflecting with your partner. Give yourself the gift of time.

Here are some things to know and do:

• Know when you want to get married – You don’t have to have an exact date – although some couples do – but have a range in mind, whether it’s any Saturday in October of 2020, for instance, or simply sometime between May and November. If there are particularly important guests who must be present for your wedding, check in with them before your tour to find out if there are dates when they cannot come.

I enjoy helping couples work out their final date when they are here for their tour, and often bring insight that’s useful.

• Know your budget – Your budget represents the total amount of money you have to spend for absolutely everything. That includes your venue, catering, photography, entertainment, decorating, officiant, ceremony music, and cake. An experienced venue owner or manager can tell you what you’re likely to spend on each, and if their venue is within your means.

• Know how many people you plan to invite – Your guest list determines how large or small a venue you’ll need. Try to narrow it down to within ten guests. Guest lists go up and down during wedding planning, but the closer you can get to a final count before you start to shop for venues, the more easily you’ll be able to chose just the right venue.

• Consider what’s important to you – What kind of space do you want? How should it feel? Do you want lots of light? Is an outside ceremony important? What about location? City? Country? Sit down with your sweetie and write down as many thoughts and feelings about your wedding as you can.

• Study each venue’s website – Some venues have a very basic web presence, with not much information or photographs, and some are extensive. You don’t need to have it all memorized, but you – both of you – should give the venue’s website a good look before your tour. It should answer some if not all of your questions and tell you what else you’ll want to ask when you visit in person.

• Write your questions down – Use your list of what’s important to create your questions for the venue staff. When you’ve taken the time to think about what you want, they can focus on what’s important to you.

• Experience the venue together – There is no substitute for in-person impressions. Unless you’re fully and totally committed to having only one of you choose the venue, both of you need to see every venue on your list, in person. Standing in the space, feeling it, is often the only way to know if it’s right for you.

• Take notes – The pros and cons of each venue will very quickly get scrambled in your brain after you’ve seen three or four. Make sure that one of you takes notes. And sit down with your sweetie right after each visit and record your impressions. Keeping good notes will make all the difference later on.

• Be open and honest – The more of your needs and desires you share with the venue staff, the better they can help you with your wedding.

Finally… Set an intention to make your wedding planning process fun, easy for each other, and full of love. Be patient with each other. Look for common ground, and explore the “heart” and “head” aspects of each decision. Holding good space for each other and being in a mindset of discovery and wonder will serve you well in keeping the planning process centered around a celebration of love and unity.

Next time: Let’s talk dessert!

David L. Egan is the proprietor and steward of Chase Court, a wedding and event venue in downtown Baltimore. Visit Chasecourt.com, and follow ChaseCourtWeddingVenue on Instagram and Facebook.

Venue Tour

Checklist

Some of the best fun you’ll have in planning your wedding is visiting venues! You get to see interesting and unique spaces, some of which you’d never see otherwise.

Choosing a venue takes time. There is information to gather, places to visit, and time to spend talking and reflecting with your partner. Give yourself the gift of time.

Here are some things to know and do:

• Know when you want to get married – You don’t have to have an exact date – although some couples do – but have a range in mind, whether it’s any Saturday in October of 2020, for instance, or simply sometime between May and November. If there are particularly important guests who must be present for your wedding, check in with them before your tour to find out if there are dates when they cannot come.

I enjoy helping couples work out their final date when they are here for their tour, and often bring insight that’s useful.

• Know your budget – Your budget represents the total amount of money you have to spend for absolutely everything. That includes your venue, catering, photography, entertainment, decorating, officiant, ceremony music, and cake. An experienced venue owner or manager can tell you what you’re likely to spend on each, and if their venue is within your means.

• Know how many people you plan to invite – Your guest list determines how large or small a venue you’ll need. Try to narrow it down to within ten guests. Guest lists go up and down during wedding planning, but the closer you can get to a final count before you start to shop for venues, the more easily you’ll be able to chose just the right venue.

• Consider what’s important to you – What kind of space do you want? How should it feel? Do you want lots of light? Is an outside ceremony important? What about location? City? Country? Sit down with your sweetie and write down as many thoughts and feelings about your wedding as you can.

• Study each venue’s website – Some venues have a very basic web presence, with not much information or photographs, and some are extensive. You don’t need to have it all memorized, but you – both of you – should give the venue’s website a good look before your tour. It should answer some if not all of your questions and tell you what else you’ll want to ask when you visit in person.

• Write your questions down – Use your list of what’s important to create your questions for the venue staff. When you’ve taken the time to think about what you want, they can focus on what’s important to you.

• Experience the venue together – There is no substitute for in-person impressions. Unless you’re fully and totally committed to having only one of you choose the venue, both of you need to see every venue on your list, in person. Standing in the space, feeling it, is often the only way to know if it’s right for you.

• Take notes – The pros and cons of each venue will very quickly get scrambled in your brain after you’ve seen three or four. Make sure that one of you takes notes. And sit down with your sweetie right after each visit and record your impressions. Keeping good notes will make all the difference later on.

• Be open and honest – The more of your needs and desires you share with the venue staff, the better they can help you with your wedding.

Finally… Set an intention to make your wedding planning process fun, easy for each other, and full of love. Be patient with each other. Look for common ground, and explore the “heart” and “head” aspects of each decision. Holding good space for each other and being in a mindset of discovery and wonder will serve you well in keeping the planning process centered around a celebration of love and unity.

Next time: Let’s talk dessert!

Please follow and like us:
error

Author Profile

David Egan
David Egan
David L. Egan is the proprietor and steward of Chase Court, a wedding and event venue in downtown Baltimore. Visit Chasecourt.com, and follow ChaseCourtWeddingVenue on Instagram and Facebook.