Books as Gifts

As we search for those special gifts this time of year, books may provide the perfect answer – especially if you, your family, or friends are working through transgender issues. For trans children or children of transgender relatives, books help to show an understanding of gender and what it means to be trans. Young adults will find positive role models with whom they can relate. For parents and adults, books offer a source of guidance and support. Please follow and like us:

Father’s Day for a Transwoman

Father’s Day is upon us once again. For thousands of transwomen who are dads, this can be a difficult weekend. Some are no longer permitted to see their children. Others with grown children are kept away from their grandchildren and excluded from the family festivities. It is hurtful when once loving relationships are cast aside as transgender parents and grandparents struggle with their identities and family dynamics. Please follow and like us:

Father’s Day for a Transwoman

Father’s Day is upon us once again. For thousands of transwomen who are dads, this can be a difficult weekend. Some are no longer permitted to see their children. Others with grown children are kept away from their grandchildren and excluded from the family festivities. It is hurtful when once loving relationships are cast aside as transgender parents and grandparents struggle with their identities and family dynamics. Please follow and like us:

Thirsty Flock at an Oasis

Transgender Conferences– A time for reflection The Keystone Conference, held annually in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, recently celebrated its ninth year with a gathering of over 800 attendees. Most were transgender women and men, joined by healthcare providers, allies, significant others, and family. Together, participants reflected upon the joys, the pain, and the harsh realities of what it means to be transgender in our society today. Please follow and like us:

Thirsty Flock at an Oasis

Transgender Conferences– A time for reflection The Keystone Conference, held annually in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, recently celebrated its ninth year with a gathering of over 800 attendees. Most were transgender women and men, joined by healthcare providers, allies, significant others, and family. Together, participants reflected upon the joys, the pain, and the harsh realities of what it means to be transgender in our society today. Please follow and like us:

A Transwoman’s Take on the March

Seldom does there come along a truly life-changing event, but the Women’s March on Washington was just that for so many of us who attended. The excited conversation on our bus that evening and the many other people with whom I have talked since that momentous Saturday attest to the overwhelming experience the march had been. We had come together from across the country with common concerns, and experienced such profound kindness from one another as we marched through the streets of Washington (and stood trapped within the sea of pink hats). Never had I been in a crowd so […]

Absolutely No Compromise

In early November the third annual Transgender Spectrum Conference was held at Washington University in St. Louis. The conference was a gathering of gender diversity– cis and trans, non-binary, gender-queer, educators, health professionals, families and children. It was a celebration of our movement – the acceptance of transgender people and their allies and an uplifting show of awareness and support for transgender individuals of all ages. Please follow and like us:

Looking Back

Ten years ago, the struggle for transgender awareness and acceptance was a struggle largely unnoticed. I had just begun my own transition and could never have imagined how much society would transition with me. Transgender people were so far off the radar that it was actually legal for a transwoman to use the ladies restroom in North Carolina. Ten years have brought profound change in our struggle for equality – some beyond anything we thought possible, and some changes that have brought renewed hate and suspicion. Please follow and like us:

The Ten Year Milestone

This past summer marked my ten-year anniversary as Laura. It was June 12, 2006 that I stepped out of a Pennsylvania courthouse with my legal name change document in my hand. That afternoon I went to the Social Security office to change my name and then to PennDot for my updated driver’s license – new name and new photo. (It would not be until a year later that I was permitted to change the “M” to “F” on my license.) Please follow and like us:

Getting to Know Us

According to a 2015 Pew research poll, 88% of Americans say they personally know someone who is gay or lesbian. That’s really good news for the gay community and likely a major cause for the social gains made in the past several years. In contrast, only 16% know a transgender person (according to a report from GLAAD in 2015) – only 9% of Americans over 45 say the same. For transgender folks, although the number has doubled in the last eight years, the challenge is clear. We have a long way to go in making ourselves more familiar, especially on […]