Remembering Sunday

The worst part about adulthood is losing people you love, people of your own generation that are supposed to make it senility with you. While these deaths leave massive holes in our lives and our families, they are in the bluntest phrasing possible, part of the natural human lifecycle.  I am talking about the sudden deaths of friends from childhood. Friends lost in the blink of an eye from events that we could not rationalize the how and the why they occurred.  I am thirty-three years old and I have three tattoos on my body for friends that have left […]

The Case of Close

Glenn Close is a legend. Her career is now in its fifth decade and, along the way, she’s racked up an impressive list of accolades: 3 Emmys, 3 Tonys, and 3 Golden Globe Awards. She’s also been nominated for an Oscar eight times, but has yet to win the entertainment industry’s most prestigious award. Vanity Fair has described Close as “one of the great actresses of our time” and, in 2019, Time magazine included her as one of its 100 most influential people. With a resume like this, it’s safe to say that Glenn Close is an A-lister and living […]

The Man in Photo 247

I have some big post-pandemic plans, but one of the things I’m looking forward to most is going to the movies. Specifically, I’m looking forward to Bob’s Burgers: The Movie. The animated sitcom that inspired the movie has become my own personal happy place during the pandemic and I’ve watched it literally every day. In my last column I wrote about how learning Spanish has become an important part of my pandemic routine; what I didn’t mention is that my Spanish lessons are always accompanied by a few episodes of Bob’s Burgers. It’s a warm, funny, progressive show where nothing […]

Dancing Through Quarantine

I am overdue for a joyous article remarks just about everyone in my circle. I mean considering the fact that the last six months have been nothing but either candid thoughts on where we have erred in our handling of [insert national crisis of choice] or imploring us all to remember our empathy, I can see where they are coming from. If you do not know me personally, I am assuming that you think I am nothing more than a frustrated and beleaguered trans person simply trying to navigate having to work with the public and everything that comes with […]

Are You Surprised?

The first thought that rolled into my brain when I learned that Ted Cruz had fled a Texas that had become Arendelle after Elsa let it go, was “of course he did.” Because, to skip all of the introductory banter, of course he did. Of course, he left his state and his constituents to soak up the Mexican paradise, without the family dog. The dog and the security guard could keep each other warm as they watched the Cruz family drive away towards the airport, without a single empathetic thought amongst them. As the reports continued to air, and were […]

The Constant Anchor

Every day begins the same. I wake up, feed my dog, and brew a pot of coffee. Then I cozy up on the couch and begin my daily Spanish lessons, sipping coffee while my mind and body power up and prepare for the day. At first, I simply wanted to brush up on all the high school Spanish I learned and later forgot after years of disuse. It was a fun and easy way to start the day, with the added benefit of seeing tangible progress both within the language app and in my new ability to understand and  comprehend […]

Not an Advocate, Just a Devil

Watching the snow peacefully falling outside of my window this morning was a peaceful respite from the angry and exhausting debating I have been doing via social media for much of the later part of this week. You see, if you have been residing in a communication-free bubble, you might be unaware, but President Biden (love being able to type that name after that title) officially rescinded the very discriminatory practices precluding trans Americans being able to serve both their country and live as their valid and authentic gender. As it is when any minority/marginalized group is thrust into the […]

The Sound of Freedom

Can instrumental music be offensive? It’s an interesting question because most of our musical objections pertain to lyrics and controversial or objectionable content. Sure, you can think instrumental music is good, bad, or anything in between, but can it be offensive?             It turns out the answer is yes. In 1944, Russian-born composer and pianist Igor Stravinsky received a warning from the Boston Police over his instrumental arrangement of “The Star-Spangled Banner.” The police wrongly believed that there was a law against “tampering” with the national anthem, and Stravinsky pulled his arrangement from the program of upcoming concerts in compliance. […]

After the Dust Has Settled

When I was seventeen, I had an experience while white-water rafting. A brush with drowning that left me showering facing away from the stream of water for a solid decade, and an uneasy reality that comes from learning that contrary to what you convince yourself, the horrible things that happen to strangers across the globe, can happen to you in an instant. An eventful fourteen years later, I find myself feeling very similar to how I did when I was plucked from the water, and able to take the first deep breath of just air, after gulping down more river […]

Red County Blues

We did it. We survived what has been called the most important election in our nation’s history and it seems the whole country is having a lot of feelings. Some of us are elated; some are devastated. And there are people somewhere in between. We all have our opinions, and we are each entitled to these opinions. It was our opinions that resulted in the last four years and that have decided what the next four years will bring. The big question, though, is how do we move forward in a way that heals deep divisions and unites millions of […]